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COVID-19 Rapid Response

Exploring the COVID Journey through Photovoice: Experiences Across the Socioeconomic Spectrum

PI: MALATHI SRINIVASA (MEDICINE)

collaborators: Catherine Johnson (Medicine), Latha Palaniappan (Medicine), Christopher Sharp (Medicine), Stacie Vilendrer (Medicine), Kenji Taylor (MediCINE), Jonathan Shaw (MedICINE), Maja Artandi (Medicine), Carla Pugh (Medicine), Sonoo ThadaneY (Medicine)

 

The 2020 COVID-19 pandemic has unveiled the enormous disparities in disease exposure and care received by vulnerable communities.   We want to understand barriers to high quality healthcare, and improve health equity for our vulnerable populations.   

Through this grant, we will conduct a photovoice study to understand the healthcare journey of 24 Stanford COVID-19 patients, including people who are medically vulnerable (safety net insurance) and well resourced (private insurance) in 4 ethnic groups (African American, Latin X, Asian and non-Hispanic White).  Photovoice qualitative research invites participants to take photos of objects, places, situations in their lives based on guiding questions – in this case, about their preCOVID, COVID, and post-COVID life, and hopes for the future.  We then discuss COVID-19 experiences and insights with participants based on their photos, focusing on the National Academy of Medicine “Quintuple Aim”, which prioritizes equity and inclusion.   Then, we will convene a national conference to identify relevant, reportable Equity Metrics for healthcare organizations, based on our findings.  We will also use study results to improve equity in our Virtual Health/telemedicine program.  Finally, we will create a website “The COVID Journey” to share participants’ stories along their COVID journey.

StageCast: A Digital Theater Tool

PI: Michael Rau (Theater and Performance Studies)

Collaborators: Tsachy Weisman (Electrical Engineering); Keith Winstein (Computer Science); Dustin Schroeder (Geophysics)

Due to the recent coronavirus crisis, nearly all theaters across the US have been shuttered, and the artists who work on these stages have been laid off. To help these artists continue to make theatrical performances an interdisciplinary team of Stanford faculty, grad students, and undergraduates are collaborating to develop a series of interlinked technologies to allow theater artists to make performances online. These technologies range from improving the audio and video streaming technologies, to developing new tools for live video switching and editing, to applications involving machine learning and computer vision. We will be using this funding to develop prototypes of these new technologies as well as hold analysis sessions and seminars with faculty at Stanford and industry professionals to evaluate and discuss the ways in which this technology could affect the theater industry.

Real-time COVID-19 Education and Preparing for Future Crises Education

PROJECT LEADS: JASSI PANNU (MEDICINE), RISHI MEDIRATTA (PEDIATRICS), KARA BROWER (BIOENGINEERING), ALANA O'MARA (MEDICINE), KIMBERLY DEBRULER (MEDICINE)

COLLABORATORS: YVONNE (BONNIE) MALDONADO (PEDIATRICS; HEALTH RESEARCH AND POLICY), DAVID RELMAN (MEDICINE; MICROBIOLOGY; IMMUNOLOGY), PETE KLENOW (ECONOMICS POLICY), DAVID LEWIS (PEDIATRICS; IMMUNOLOGY), SEEMA YASMIN (MEDICINE)

The COVID-19 Elective was opened to all Stanford students Spring 2020, and was arranged in less than 10 days after Stanford students were notified that all in-person classes were cancelled. Hundreds of undergraduate and graduate students enrolled, demonstrating their intense desire to understand the pandemic, have information from trustworthy sources, and engage with other students during this tumultuous time of self-isolation. The course featured lectures from experts in the field, as well as Stanford students actively engaging in COVID-19 work. It was conducted via Zoom and Slack, with live expert Q&A and student discussion sections. 

This year, the COVID-19 Elective (PEDS 220) will return with lectures focusing on the societal and technological aspects of COVID-19. Vaccine developments, racial disparities, mental health, and the economic effects of the pandemic on low and middle income countries are just a few of the topics that will be covered. Seed funding has allowed us to expand this course to an optional 2-credit version that includes student projects. With these projects, we aim to combat isolation, COVID-19 fatigue, and empower our students to continue to take action on this ongoing crisis.

Zoom Fatigue: Understanding the Effects of Videoconferencing on Well-Being

PI: JEFFREY HANCOCK (COMMUNICATION) 

COLLABORATORS: JEREMY BAILENSON (COMMUNICATION) MUFAN LUO (COMMUNICATION), GERALDINE FAUVILLE (COMMUNICATION), ANNA QUEIROZ (EDUCATION)

Given that society will continue to rely on videoconferencing technology for “distant socializing” during the COVID-19 pandemic, a core issue is to understand the effects of videoconferencing at this scale on human society. Using survey methods our project will address two inter-related but distinct questions: 1) How does videoconferencing affect psychological well-being over the medium and long term? and 2) How and why does videoconferencing lead to exhaustion.

Our findings will shed lights on the longitudinal effects of distant socializing on loneliness and other well-being outcomes during the COVID19 pandemic, and will examine the nature of 'Zoom fatigue' so often reported in the media. The project will illuminate the societal impact of the world-wide shift to videoconferencing for social interactions in terms of the immediate effects of exhaustion on mental health and the long term effects on psychological well-being. While filling this hole in our knowledge is urgent, our ultimate goal is to create new guidelines and best practices for how families, businesses and students and teachers can use videoconferencing in ways that enhance our well-being and minimize the possible risks, such as exhaustion, that come with the large-scale shift to videoconferencing.