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Kinch Hoekstra / Political Theory Workshop

May 29, 2020 - 1:15pm to 3:00pm
Event Sponsor: 
Department of Political Science, McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society

Kinch Hoekstra specializes in the history of political, moral, and legal philosophy. He has written on ancient, renaissance, and early modern political thought. He has published a number of studies on ancient political thought, including "Athenian Democracy and Popular Tyranny" (2016) and "Thucydides and the Politics of Necessity" (2017, with Mark Fisher). Another focus of research has been the philosophy of Thomas Hobbes (including studies of his theory of equality, obligation, democracy, tyranny, mixed government, natural law, and the rationality of justice); he co-edited The Oxford Handbook of Hobbes (2016).

Jointly appointed with the UC Berkeley School of Law, Hoekstra is also an affiliated professor in the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Classics. From 1996 to 2007, Hoekstra was a member of the Faculty of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he also regularly taught graduate students in the Faculty of Classics and the Department of Politics and International Relations. During this same period, he was the Leveson Gower Fellow in Ancient and Modern Philosophy at Balliol College.

Hoekstra has been the Carlyle Lecturer in the History of Political Thought at the University of Oxford and a Visiting Professorial Fellow at Nuffield College (2017), a Rockefeller Visiting Faculty Fellow at the Center for Human Values at Princeton University (2011-12), a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton (2004-5), and an Ahmanson-Getty Fellow at UCLA (2001-2). He will give the Benedict Lectures on the History of Political Philosophy at Boston University in 2018.


The Political Theory Workshop offers faculty and other scholars an opportunity to present "in progress" or recently completed work to a diverse audience from political science, philosophy, law, and other social sciences and humanities. Workshop papers come from all areas of political theory, including normative and positive theory, legal theory, and the history of political thought. Papers are circulated ten days before the seminar. Participants are expected to read the paper before the workshop. Each session begins with comments and questions on the paper by a discussant, a brief response from the author, followed by a general discussion.

 

Location: 
Encina Hall West, Room 400 (GSL)
Admission: 
All members of the university community are welcome to attend. To obtain copies of the papers under discussion and receive weekly email announcements, contact Brian Coyne
Contact Email: 
bkcoyne@stanford.edu