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2019 Junior Scholars

Our second annual Junior Scholars Workshop will be held June 10-11, 2019.
Linda Eggert

Linda Eggert

Linda Eggert is a doctoral candidate in political theory at the University of Oxford, where she works at the intersection of moral, political and legal philosophy. Her current research focuses on the distribution of risks of harm in humanitarian interventions, and related issues in global rectificatory justice and non-consequentialist ethics. Linda is also a Technology and Human Rights Fellow at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, and her most recent project concerns the ethics of using artificial intelligence in contexts of defensive harming.

Her workshop paper is titled, "Harming In Other-Defense."

Hochan Kim

Hochan Kim

Hochan "Sonny" Kim is a Ph.D. candidate in politics at Princeton University, where he is undertaking the Program in Political Philosophy. He holds a B.Phil in philosophy from the University of Oxford as well as a B.A. in philosophy and in political science from Brown University. His research interests lie mainly in political theory and social philosophy, and he is currently working on the relationship between historical injustice and structural injustice.

His workshop paper is titled, "What's the Point of Reparations?"

Marco Meyer

Marco Meyer

Marco Meyer has a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Cambridge and is currently reading for a Ph.D. in economics at the University of Groningen. He received a master’s degree in philosophy from Oxford University, a B.A. in philosophy and economics from Bayreuth University, and a B.A. in European history from Bayreuth University. His research interests include financial ethics, applied epistemology and global justice. He has taught students at the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, and has given seminars on philosophy and economics.

His workshop paper is titled, "Dealing Fairly with Trade Imbalances within Monetary Unions."

Luise Müeller

Luise Müeller

Luise K. Müeller is a postdoctoral researcher at Technische Universität Dresden, Germany. After having completed her doctorate in political theory, she held a postdoctoral fellowship in practical philosophy, both at Freie Universität Berlin. Her research focuses on issues concerning justice and legitimacy, social cooperation and the justification of punishment, human rights and animal rights, and the philosophy of John Rawls.

Her workshop paper is titled, "Social Cooperation and the Rights of Nonhuman Animals."

Costanza Porro

Costanza Porro

Costanza Porro recently completed her Ph.D. at the Dickson Poon School of Law of King’s College London. She holds an M.A. in philosophy from King’s College London and a B.A. in philosophy from the University of Pavia. During her Ph.D. she was also a visiting research student at the School of Philosophy of the Australian National University. Her research interests lie mainly in political philosophy, legal theory and criminal law theory, and her research explores the implications of the ideal of social equality for theorizing criminal punishment, including issues such as penal disenfranchisement, the role of blame in the criminal justice system, and the justification of incarceration.

Her workshop paper is titled, "State Blame for Criminal Wrongdoing: A Skeptical View."

Macy Salzberger

Macy Salzberger

Macy Salzberger is a Ph.D. candidate at UNC-Chapel Hill working in ethics and social/political philosophy. Within ethics and social/political philosophy, she pays particular attention to feminist philosophy and philosophy of education. Her current primary research program develops an account of the meaning and moral significance of gender-based violence and how its wrong-making features ought to affect our policy and practice. She is also working on projects in ethics and education in non-ideal circumstances.

Her workshop paper is titled, "Rethinking the Distinctiveness of Domestic Violence."

Anthony Smith

Anthony Smith

Anthony P. Smith is currently finishing his Ph.D. in the philosophy department at the University of Utah, where his dissertation centers on the ethics of risky decision making. In the fall, he'll be joining the faculty at Snow College as an assistant professor of English and Philosophy. Having a keen interest in applied ethics, Tony's research deals with how to make sound decisions when it comes to organ transplantation, genetics and climate change. Given these and other questions, Tony has broad interests in not only applied ethics, but also normative ethics, decision theory, and the philosophy of medicine and science. With grad school and the dissertation done, he's excited to return to old hobbies and start new ones, like hiking and fly fishing.

His workshop paper is titled, "Abandoning the Dead Donor Rule."