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Writer's Workshop

Every year, the Center hosts an author without a university appointment to participate in a workshop to discuss a book project that addresses or illuminates issues of ethics in public life.

The workshop brings together a small group of Stanford scholars who are relevant subject matter experts or literary scholars to provide feedback on the manuscript. In addition to the workshop, the visiting writers also present a public talk to the larger Stanford community during their brief residency on campus and meet with small groups of students and/or faculty affiliated with the Center. Each invited author later returns to Stanford for a public reading from the book after its publication.


Adrian Nicole LeBlanc

2018 Manuscript Workshop: Adrian Nicole LeBlanc

A book about contemporary American masculinity told through the world of standup comedy.  How do comedians emerge into voice?  How do they leverage authenticity to arouse spontaneous reactions in an audience?   What does laughter allow them to communicate?  What is the nature of the relationship with one’s audience when provocation is sometimes used as a strategy? 

ADRIAN NICOLE LEBLANC is an independent journalist who is best known for her 2003 nonfiction book Random Family: Love, Drugs, Trouble, and Coming of Age in the Bronx, which chronicles the struggles of two young women as they deal with love, growing families, poverty, and prison time. The book took more than ten years to research and write and has received many awards, among them the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award and the Ron Ridenhour Book Prize.  In 2006, she was a recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship. In 2010, Random Family was named one of the Top Ten Works of Journalism of the Decade by the Arthur L. Carter Institute of Journalism at NYU.

LeBlanc has written for many publications including the Village Voice, Harper’s, the New York Times Magazine, and the New Yorker. Grants, fellowships, and residencies have been essential to her long-term, immersive work, including: The Barbara Deming Women’s Memorial Fund, the Open Society Institute, the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, The American Academy in Berlin, Blue Mountain Center, Cottages at Hedgebrook, the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, and the Logan Nonfiction Fellowship at the Carey Institute for Global Good.

Adrian will give a public lecture entitled "Slow Journalism: Resisting the Pull of Immediacy" from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, April 5 at The Stanford Law School, Room 190. The event is free and open to the public. 


Eliza Griswold

2017 Manuscript Workshop: Eliza Griswold

In March 2017, Eliza Griswold workshopped her manuscript, now published as Amity and Prosperity: One Family and the Fracturing of America (FSG, June 2018),with a small group of scholars. In this new book, Griswold focuses on the ethical questions related to the promise of  American energy independence. What does American energy independence mean to those Americans who live in the regions richest in these resources? Who will benefit and who will be left paying the social and environmental costs? The author presented a public lecture entitled Healing a Fractured Nation on Wednesday, March 1, 2017 at 7:00pm in Leventhal Hall, Humanities Center.

ELIZA GRISWOLD'S reportage and poetry have appeared in The New Yorker,The New York Times Magazine, and The Atlantic,among many others. Her first nonfiction book, The Tenth Parallel,a New York Times Bestseller, was awarded the Lukas Prize and her most recent collection of poems, translated from Pashto, was awarded a PEN Prize in Translation. She's been awarded a Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome for her poetry and a Guggenheim Fellowship for her nonfiction work. She's held fellowships at the New America Foundation and Harvard University, where she's currently a Beggruen Fellow. She has taught at Princeton University, Johns Hopkins, and Columbia University. She holds an honorary doctorate from the University of the South.

 


Philip Gourevitch

2016 Manuscript Workshop: Philip Gourevitch

2015-16 was the inaugural year for the Writers' Worshop. In May 2016, Philip Gourevitch workshopped his manuscript, You Hide That You Hate Me And I Hide That I Know, with a small group of scholars. Gourevitch, a staff writer at The New Yorker and author of We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed With Our Families: Stories from Rwanda (1998), describes his current book as "a revisiting of Rwanda twenty years after the genocide to tell the confounding story of how such a nation puts itself back together." The author presented a public lecture entitled Shouldn't Massacring Your Neighbors Be Unforgivable? on Tuesday, February 23, 2016 at 7:00pm in Stanford Law School, Room 190. 

PHILIP GOUREVITCH is a long-time staff writer for The New Yorker, the former editor of The Paris Review, and the author of three books: The Ballad Of Abu Ghraib / Standard Operating Procedure (2008); A Cold Case (2001), and We Wish To Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed With Our Families: Stories from Rwanda (1998), which won the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Award, the George K. Polk Book Award, the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for First Nonfiction, the New York Public Library Helen Bernstein Award, and the Guardian First Book Award. The book was also included in The Guardian’s list of the hundred greatest non-fiction books from the past two thousand five hundred years. Gourevitch’s books have been translated into more than a dozen languages, and his reportage, essays, criticism, and short fiction, have appeared in numerous publications at home and abroad. In 2010 he was named a Chevallier de l’Ordre des Arts et Des Lettres in France, and he was the Spring 2016 Stein Visiting Writer at Stanford.