Is a Responsible Conservatism Still Possible? Was It Ever?

Date
Thu February 13th 2020, 7:00 - 8:30pm
Event Sponsor
McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society
Location
Cubberley Auditorium, 485 Lasuen Mall, Stanford
Reserved seats (free) have been "sold out." General admission will be available at the door.
Is a Responsible Conservatism Still Possible? Was It Ever?

Reserved seats (free) have been "sold out." General admission will be available at the door.

Is a responsible and constructive conservatism still possible when President Trump is the leader of the Republican Party and conservatism is, apparently, being re-shaped as Trumpism? Or was conservatism always just a kind of disguised Trumpism? In any case, what are the key questions that will have to be answered in the next months and years in order to determine whether American conservatism has a future, and whether American conservatism is a defensible conservatism?

Please join us for a conversation with political analyst and commentator William Kristol. He is a founding director of Defending Democracy Together, an educational and advocacy organization dedicated to defending America’s liberal democratic norms, principles and institutions. He has long been recognized as a leading participant in and analyst of American politics and has helped shape the national debate on issues ranging from American foreign policy to the meaning of American conservatism.

Kristol was a founder of the Weekly Standard in 1995 and edited the influential magazine for over two decades. Before starting the Weekly Standard, he led the Project for the Republican Future, where he helped developed the strategy that produced the 1994 Republican congressional victory. Early in his career, Kristol served in senior positions in the Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush Administrations.

Before coming to Washington, Kristol taught politics at the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard University. He received his undergraduate degree and his Ph.D. from Harvard University.

This talk is part of the Ethics Center's Arrow Lecture Series, which honors the late Nobel Laureate Kenneth Arrow, the Joan Kenney Professor of Economics and Professor of Operations Research, Emeritus.