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2018 Junior Scholars

Our inaugural Junior Scholars Workshop was held from June 7-9, 2018.
Jessica JT Fischer

Jessica JT Fischer

Jessica JT Fischer is a Ph.D. candidate in philosophy at University College London. She has also completed her M.Phil Philosophy, M.A. Philosophy and her B.A. in European Social and Political Studies at UCL.

Jessica's research interests lie mainly in ethics and political philosophy, and her current work focuses on contractualism, the separateness of persons and problems of risk and aggregation. Her workshop paper is called "Warding off the Threat of Aggregation: A Defense of Ex Ante Contractualism." 

Giacomo Floris

Giacomo Floris

Giacomo Floris is a doctoral researcher in Political Theory at MANCEPT, University of Manchester. He holds an M.A. in Political Theory from the University of Manchester and an M.A. in Philosophy from the University of Genova.

Giacomo is mainly interested in moral and political philosophy, with special interests in moral equality, respect and other evaluative attitudes, and distributive justice. His workshop paper is called "On the Basis of Moral Equality."

Dana Howard

Dana Howard

Dana Howard is a tenure-track instructor in the Ohio State University Center for Bioethics in the College of Medicine, and she is also affiliated with the OSU Philosophy Department. Prior to coming to OSU, Dana completed her Ph.D. in Philosophy at Brown University and worked as a post-doctoral fellow in the Clinical Center Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health. Dana's research explores the normative and legal implications of medical decision-making, the norms of advising, the ethics of biobanking, and the relationship between medicine and disability. Her work has been published or is forthcoming in The Journal of Medical Ethics, The Journal of Political Philosophy, Philosophical Studies, and The Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics.

Dana's workshop paper is called "Transformative Choices and the Specter of Regret."

Johannes Kniess

Johannes Kniess

Johannes Kniess is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in Values and Public Policy at Princeton University, where he is affiliated with the University Center for Human Values and the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance. His research interests lie in the fields of political theory, moral philosophy, and bioethics, and he is particularly interested in how theories of social and global justice apply to health policy. Kniess holds a D.Phil in Politics from the University of Oxford and an M.A. (Diplom) from the Freie Universität Berlin.

Johannes' workshop paper is called "Medical Migration between Coercion and Persuasion."

Thomas Rowe

Thomas Rowe

Thomas is a postdoctoral fellow in PPE at Virginia Tech. Before moving to the United States, he studied for a Ph.D. in philosophy at the London School of Economics. He is currently working in the area of distributive ethics under conditions of risk and uncertainty, and he's also interested in existential risk, the ethics of humanitarian aid and the nature of complicity. His workshop paper is called "Aiding, Complicity and Blameworthiness." 

Larisa Svirsky

Larisa Svirsky

Larisa Svirsky is a Ph.D. candidate at UNC Chapel Hill working in ethics and philosophy of psychiatry. Her dissertation offers an account of responsibility motivated by how we hold so-called "marginal agents," such as children and addicts, responsible in ordinary life. She argues that the best way to accommodate commonsense judgments about holding these agents responsible is to reflect on the role that relationships play in teaching us how to be responsible by creating normative expectations for our behavior. Considering how our relationships with others animate our responsibility practices allows us to appreciate the continuity between marginal and non-marginal agents as participants in the moral community.

Larisa's workshop paper is called "Responsibility and the Problem of So-Called Marginal Agents.”

Olúfẹ́mi Táíwò 

Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò 

Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò is a Ph.D. candidate in UCLA's philosophy department and incoming Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Georgetown University. His research interests include meta-ethics and social/political philosophy, especially as they intersect with post-colonial thought and the Black Radical Tradition. His workshop paper is called "Reconsidering Reparations."

Robin Zheng

Robin Zheng

ROBIN ZHENG is an assistant professor of Philosophy at Yale-NUS College. Her research focuses on issues of moral responsibility and structural injustice, along with other topics in ethics, moral psychology, feminist and social philosophy, and philosophy of race. Her recent publications include “Precarity is a Feminist Issue: Gender and Contingent Labor in the Academy” in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, “Bias, Structure, and Injustice: A Reply to Haslanger” in Feminist Philosophy Quarterly, “Why Yellow Fever Isn’t Flattering: A Case Against Racial Fetish” in the Journal of the American Philosophical Association, and “Attributability, Accountability, and Implicit Bias” in Implicit Bias and Philosophy: Volume 2 (eds. Jennifer Saul and Michael Brownstein).

Robin's workshop paper is called "What is my Role in Changing the System? A New Model of Responsibility for Structural Injustice."